Damien Flood: Cú Chulainn Comforted - Basic Space Dublin 6 – 13 March, 2015

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Damien Flood

Cú Chulainn Comforted

 

Basic Space

Eblana House, Marrowbone Lane.

Dublin 8

 

Exhibition dates: 6 – 13 March 2015

Preview: 6-8pm Thursday 5 march, 2015

 

 

 

Cú Chulainn Comforted

 

-Neal Tait

-Damien Flood

-Sanja Todorović

-Sinéad Ní Mhaonaigh

-Mathis Gasser

-Billy Mag Fhloinn

 

curated by Joshua Sex

 

A MAN that had six mortal wounds, a man Violent and famous, strode among the dead;

Eyes stared out of the branches and were gone.

 

Opening hours vary, please check our facebook.

 

www.damienflood.ie

https://basicspacedublin.wordpress.com/2013/03/05/new-space-at-marrowbone-lane/

 

 

 

Sarah Pierce: THINKING THROUGH INSTITUTIONS – SYMPOSIUM 27TH FEB 2015, The Huston School of Film & Digital Media – NUI Galway

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

THINKING THOUGH INSTITUTIONS

The Huston School of Film & Digital Media

NUI Galway

10 – 5pm Friday 27th Feb 2015

 

In the context of what some call the crisis of the institution, the questions of how we organise ourselves, how we work together and how potentially we self-institute have never seemed so pertinent to ask, yet we seem to continually reach an idealogical impasse, do we withdraw from existing structures, or do we attempt to reclaim and reinvent them? The institutions of culture and art seem to be some of the last remaining public spaces for such re-imaginings, but how does this extend beyond providing the cultural content for such discourse and into the very organisational structure and activity of the institution itself? And with diminishing public resources with a drive to increase private sources of funding, for how long will these spaces remain public? Has socially engaged arts practice and critical curatorial work impacted how we consider the role and activities and agency of art institutions in society? Do the self-organised, DIY organisations of artists and movements such as Occupy and Open Source provide new models of horizontal and vertical organisations? What organisational forms have the potential to engage with and constitute new publics?

 

In a time of momentous changes, and where meaning and modes of production of culture are shifting dramatically, “Thinking through institutions” offers a space to consider and discuss how we organise and institute ourselves and the potential role for arts institutions in the democratisation of power, debate, criticality and cultural change, with leading national and international guest speakers; Helen Carey, Nuno Sacramento, Fiona Woods, Lane Raylea, Sarah Rifky, Sarah Pierce, Mick Wilson and more.

 

The contributors:

Lane Relyea teaches in the Department of Art Theory & Practice at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois, and is also the editor-in-chief of Art Journal, a quarterly publication of the College Art Association. Since 1983 his essays and reviews have appeared in numerous magazines including Artforum, Afterall, Texte zur Kunst, Parkett, Frieze, Modern Painters, Art in America and Flash Art. He has written monographs on Polly Apfelbaum, Richard Artschwager, Vija Celmins, Toba Khedoori, Monique Prieto and Wolfgang Tillmans among others, and contributed to such exhibition catalogs as Helter Skelter and Public Offerings (both Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, 1992 and 2001 respectively). He has delivered lectures at New York’s Museum of Modern Art, Harvard University, and the Art Institute of Chicago among other venues. After teaching for a decade at the California Institute of the Arts in Valencia, where he joined the faculty in 1991, in the summer of 2001 he was appointed director of the Core Program and Art History at the Glassell School of Art in Houston, Texas. His book Your Everyday Art World, on the effects of communication networks on artistic practice and its contexts, was published by MIT Press in 2013.

 

Helen Carey is Director of Fire Station Artists’ Studio in Dublin, supported by the Arts Council of Ireland, which provides support for the production and development of Art as well as residential studio accommodation for Artists.  Her most recently held positions include Director / Curator at Limerick City Gallery of Art, inaugural Director of the Centre Culturel Irlandais, Paris, Director at Galway Arts Centre and Public Art Project Manager at @Bristol, a landmark millennium project.  She has most recently worked with Artists Ewa Partum, Michael Warren, Lida Abdul, Jamal Penjweny, Mark Curran with whom she is working on a long term project THE MARKET.  Her independent curatorial practice is concerned with enquiries around memory, history, work and cultural identities.

 

Nuno Sacramento was born in Maputo, Mozambique and now lives and works in Aberdeenshire where he is Director of the Scottish Sculpture Workshop in Lumsden. He is a graduate of the deAppel curatorial training programme and also completed a Doctorate in Visual Arts at the School of Media Arts and Imaging, Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art and Design, Dundee. He is committed to issues of expediency of small arts organisations, land and ruralities, skills–sharing and co-labouration, 21st and the commons. He is involved in research, project curation, writing and lecturing.

 

Fiona Woods is a visual artist whose practice has long been concerned with questions of public-ness and common interest, and how those continue to matter or materialise in an increasingly post-public world. Her work often explores marginal or hybrid situations, taking the form of actions, images and publications, made individually and in collaboration with others. Upcoming and recent works include Im/Plants, a work with the National Sculpture Factory (Cork, 2015); one kind and another, forthcoming publication (2015); Action on the Plains, with M12 (US, 2014); Inclined to Be Lost, pamphlet for City (Re)Searches (2014); Lines in the City, with Susanne Bosch (Belfast 2013); Yak Yak, co-curated with Ian Tully (AUS, 2013). Woods is the recipient of a number of Arts Council of Ireland awards. She is a lecturer at Limerick School of Art & Design.www.fionawoodsartist.wix.com/collectionofminds

 

Sarah Pierce lives and works in Dublin, Ireland. Since 2003, she has used the term The Metropolitan Complex to describe her project. Despite its institutional resonance, this title does not signify an organization. Instead, it demonstrates Pierce’s broad understanding of cultural work, articulated through working methods that often open up to the personal and the incidental. Characterized as a way to play with a shared neuroses of place (read ‘complex’ in the Freudian sense), whether a specific locality or a wider set of circumstances that frame interaction, her activity considers forms of gathering, both historical examples and those she initiates. The processes of research and presentation that Pierce undertakes highlight a continual renegotiation of the terms for making art: the potential for dissent and self-determination, the slippages between individual work and institution, and the proximity of past artworks.

 

Sarah Rifky is a writer and curator based in Cairo where she co-founded Beirut, an art space that thinks about institution building as a curatorial act. She is founder of CIRCA (Cairo International Resource Center for Art) and was Curator at Townhouse Gallery of Contemporary Art in Cairo 2009-2011. She was a Curatorial Agent of dOCUMENTA(13) in Kassel, Germany. In 2010 she was Adjunct Professor of Art History and Theory at the American University in Cairo and co-manages MASS Alexandria, an independent study program for young artists in Egypt, with Wael Shawky. Rifky is author of The Going Insurrection (2011) and Delusions of Reference: In Defense of Art (ongoing). She is co-editor of the artist book Damascus: Tourists, Artists and Secret Agents (2009).

 

Mick Wilson (BA, MA, MSc, PhD) is an artist, teacher and researcher. He is the first Head of the Valand Academy of Arts, University of Gothenburg, Sweden (2012-); was previously the founder Dean of the Graduate School of Creative Arts and Media, Ireland (2008-2012); and prior to this was first Head of Research and Postgraduate Development for the National College of Art and Design, Ireland (2005-2007). He completed his doctoral thesis on the subject of Conflicted Faculties: Rhetoric, Knowledge Conflict and the University (NUI, 2006) and has been developing doctoral education across the arts as Chair of the SHARE Network (2010-2014); member of the European Artistic Research Network, EARN (2005-); and working on the Platform for Artistic Research PARSE (2013-).  He is editor-in-chief for the new research journal PARSE (www.parsejournal.com) launching in 2015.  Edited volumes: with Paul O’Neill (eds.) Curating Research, Publisher: OpenEditions/De Appel, London/Amsterdam (2014); with Schelte van Ruiten (ed.) SHARE Handbook for Artistic Research Education, ELIA, Amsterdam (2013); and with Paul O’Neill (ed.) Curating and the Educational Turn, Publisher: OpenEditions/De Appel, London/Amsterdam (2010).    Recent art projects / collaborations / group exhibitions include: “ODWC, Edmonton”, Latitude53, Canada (2014-5); “Aesthetics Jam”, Taipei Biennial, Taiwan (2014); “Joyful Wisdom”, Rezan Has Museum, Istanbul, Turkey (2013); “The Judgement is the Mirror”, Living Art Museum, Reykjavík, Iceland (2013); “some songs are sung slower”, (Solo) The Lab, Dublin (2013); “Of The Salt Bitter Sweet Sea: A Public Banquet”, CHQ, Dublin (2012).Recent publications include “Dead Public: An unfinished enquiry” in Catalin Gheorghe (ed.) Vector – artistic research in context, Iasi Romania (2014); “Anachronistic Aesthesis” in H.Slager (ed.) Experimental Aesthetics (2014); “Between Apparatus and Ethos: On Building a Research Pedagogy in the Arts” in James Elkins (ed.) Artists with PhDs: On the New Doctoral Degree in Studio Art, 2ed., New Academia Publishing, pp.341-359. (2014); ‘We are the Board, but what is an Assemblage?’ in M. Ambrozic & A. Vettese, (eds.) Art as a Thinking Process, Sternberg Press, (2013); “Come Promises From Teachers” in Offside Effect: Papers from the 1st Tbilisi Triennial, H. Slager (ed.), MetropolisM Books, (2013); “Blame it on Bologna” in MetropolisM No.2, April/May, Amsterdam (2013); “Art, Education and the Role of the Cultural Institution”, in B. Mikov and J. Doyle (eds.) European Management Models in Contemporary Art and Culture, Gower, London (2013).

 

This is a free event, but booking is essential:

https://www.eventbrite.ie/e/thinking-through-institutions-tickets-15537748825

 

Kindly supported by the Arts Council Curator in residence scheme, in partnership with Galway City Council, GMIT CCAM, Galway Arts Centre and the Huston Film School

 

For more information:

http://themetropolitancomplex.com

www.parainstitution.ie/thinking-through-institutions/

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alan Phelan: If you aren’t all mine – Oonagh Young Gallery Dublin, 19 February – 20 March 2015

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alan Phelan

If you aren’t all mine

 

Oonagh Young Gallery

1 James Joyce Street

Liberty Corner

Dublin 1

 

19 Feb  - 20 Mar  - 2015

 

Oonagh Young Gallery presents “if you aren’t all mine”, the second solo exhibition in the gallery by Alan Phelan. The show will be the first Dublin presentation of his 2014 film “Edwart & Arlette”, after exhibitions of the work in Belfast, Stockholm and Treignac, France; as well as the prestigious Bonn Kunstmuseum “Videonale.15” which opens later this month.

 

The film “Edwart & Arlette” was developed from Phelan’s first gallery project “Handjob” which acted like an open notebook ideas from which the script for the film was developed. That installation has been revised for the exhibition “Selective Memory” at the Lewis Glucksman Gallery, Cork and on view there until 15th March 2015.

 

As an adaptation of the Sherlock Holmes story “The Adventure of the Cardboard Box”, the narrative has been reworked considerably with shot design and dialogue originating from hand photographs collected by Phelan from self-harming social networking websites, shown in the original “Handjob” project. Words and sentence fragments found on these images were developed into dialogue and remain in the order they were found, forcing the narrative and characters to take some unexpected turns.

 

Probably the biggest shift is the removal of the Sherlock Holmes character entirely. The audience now must piece together the evidence presented, a play on the detective quandaries of much contemporary conceptual art with its tendency to present riddles. Instead, the central characters are modelled on a photograph of a French art critic and museum curator, doubling up as a gender-shifting brother/sister, with locations merged to make a more succinct yet different story. As in the original Conan Doyle text, murder and unrequited or misunderstood love remain key to the revised plot which is bleakly acted out through hand gestures and attention-seeking garbled dialogue. Irish actor Andrew Bennett puts in a remarkable performance as Edwart Vignot/Jim Browner as does Mikel Murfi as Arlette Sérullaz/Sam Cushing.

 

The installation of the film in the gallery is within a series of fabric hangings, resembling a staggered clothes line of sheets, in this case sail cloth which acts as a perfect projection material. The reference here comes from a different source, the Michael Haneke TV film 1984 “Wer war Edgar Allan” which informed much of the installations and layouts of the film and accompanying sculptures when first shown at Golden Thread Gallery Belfast last year. The Haneke film is a semi-hallucinatory story of an art student in Venice during a drug fuelled stay. In searching out and possibly murdering an Edgar Allen character, both drug dealer and cafe acquaintance, he follows Allen in one scene through the rows of washing hanging in the alleyways of the city.

 

Overall the work interrogates the nature of the narrative in script format, analysing the written word through the post-appropriation technique of re-narrativization. As is often the case with Phelan’s practice, this only encourages conflicting viewpoints through choreographed systems of chance that, at random moments, move in and out of synch. Like many artists of his generation he has embraced the hybridity and all-consuming nature of the internet to extract his own story, one that pushes the original away, yet rooted still in the ‘copy and paste’ culture that surrounds us.

 

Image:Edwart & Arlette” film still Alan Phelan 2014, courtesy of the artist

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


For more information, please visit:

www.alanphelan.com

http://oonaghyoung.com

 

Facebook Broadstone Studios

 

Ella de Búrca: GOBO – ArtBox Gallery Dublin, 6 February – 14 March 2015

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GOBO

Ella de Búrca


ArtBox Gallery,

James Joyce Street

Dublin 1

 

Preview: Thursday, February 5th, 2015

Exhibition Dates: February 6th – March 14th, 2015

 

 

 

she stands still as a spectator. (Y stops.)

we survey her as an object,

and still,

surveying a spectator surveying an object

-she knows it.

(to Y) you shouldn’t know that.

she giggles. (Y giggles.)

her body is a conduit.

taking a long hard stare at the painting nearest the door,

she slowly raises her warm arm to point her trigger finger at it.

Y: (as if remembering someone’s name.) one?

 

You can write about the present as long as you like, it will always read flat. Fluidity preserves in the unwritten, only. The viscera of a moment is translated into history through the medium of text. All information, all knowledge, is communicated through positive and negative imprints.

Likewise, this text.

 

“Each one of us is, successively, not one but many. And these successive personalities… tend to present the strangest, most astonishing contrasts.” ¹

 

The trail of Roger Casement, hero, traitor, martyr, pervert; (who he is is who he is to you) led de Burca to Iquitos, Peru where Casement’s humanitarian work had ended the savage reign of the Anglo-Peruvian Rubber company. After decades of widespread rape, torture and usury at the hands of unchecked capitalism, the indigenous culture had been all but erased. A century later, globalised capitalism has wreaked similar decay upon the monuments that those rubber barons built to themselves.

 

The same process is evident in Dublin, where the monumental Georgian buildings constructed over the bones of a crushed culture are themselves being erased by the amorphous drive of global capitalism. That which once represented our oppression now represents our heritage. In order to decide what we are, it is first necessary discover what we are not.

 

De Burca uses the physicality of the GOBO² to present sculptural works sparked by architectures role in communal identity. Working through film, photography, text and sculpture, the negative is framed as being as much a part of our identity than the positive.

 

“The labor of the negative, she sighed, and the whole mad scheme unplanned as if i were there all along with the invention of the state, the form within the form with its danger and with its decay too, underbelly of stately prowess and sanitised rigidity.

Only people with a superb talent for the theatre could pull this off. And you too could be part of this. After all, it touches everyone of us” ³

1. José Enrique Rodó

2. A negative template placed in front of projected light, creating a positive image on a flat surface. The invert, the intermediary, the fence.

3. The Magic of the State. Michael Taussig.

 

This exhibition is curated by ArtBox Director, Dr. Hilary Murray.

 

GOBO includes the performance of /portals/

Starring Aine Ní Laoghaire, Jill Harding and Bob Kelly. Written by Ella de Búrca.

/portals/ will take place at ArtBox on February 13th and 14th.

Booking is required.

 

 

Ella de Búrca, recent exhibitions include ‘Otherwise’ WYSPA Gdansk, July 2014, ‘Slow Future’ Museum of Contemporary Art CSW Warsaw, June 2014, ‘Crampographies,’ KW Institute for Contemporary Art 2014, ‘Must Go On’ RuaRed, Dublin 2014,  ‘Dis-Placement’ The Mission Gallery, Chicago 2014, ‘Rebuilding Utopia’ The Emergency Pavilion at The 53rd Venice Biennale 2013, ‘Playing Nature,’ at The 5th Moscow Biennale September 2014, ‘Haha Harcourt Road’ ArtLot Dublin 2013, and ‘Illuminating Kunstholes’ at Coffre-Fort, Brussels, Belgium, 2013. De Burca was the recipient of the Evelyn Wood Memorial Award (The Banff Centre) in 2011, as well as the Amharc Fhinne Ghall Award (Fingal County Council) in 2010.

In 2013 de Burca was awarded an exhibition grant by Culture Ireland and Fingal County Council for The Moscow Biennale. In 2014 de Burca was awarded an Arts Council Bursary from The Irish Arts Council.

 

 

Ella de Búrca would like to thank Fingal County Council for facilitating the production of GOBO.

 

 

For more information, please visit:

www.elladeburca.com

https://artboxprojects.wordpress.com

 

 

 

 

Liam O’Callaghan: FOURTH SPACE – Uillinn, West Cork Arts Centre, 31 January – 14th March 2015

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FOURTH SPACE

Uillinn – West Cork Arts Centre,

Skibbereen, Co. Cork.

 

31 January – 14 March | Opening: 31 January at 3pm

 

Opening hours: Monday-Friday 10.00-5.00

 

Fourth Space comprises sculptural and installation work by 9 leading artists based in Ireland:

David Beattie, Karl Burke, Rhona Byrne, Maud Cotter, Angela Fulcher, Mark Garry,

Caoimhe Kilfeather, Dennis McNulty and Liam O’Callaghan.

 

 

Opening the exhibition is Sam Thorne, Artistic Director of Tate St Ives, with guest speakers Cllr Alan Coleman, Mayor of County Cork and Olivia O’Leary, Journalist and Broadcaster.

 

The artworks, although materially and conceptually diverse, both articulate and respond to the galleries, the location and context of the new building, Uillinn. The exhibition, which extends throughout the ground floor and first floor galleries, draws together works by artists who share an approach to making that is fluid, questioning and open-ended and yet displays a fascination with space and materiality.

Each artist’s work remains specific to their own concerns and practice, but they come together in this exhibition to experiment with and enquire into notions of space, place, time, legacy and transformation.

 

Fourth Space, a group exhibtion at West Cork Art Centre – Curated by Ann Davoren.

WCAC acknowledges the financial support of the Arts Council in making this event possible.

 

For more information:

www.thegoodroom.com

www.westcorkartscentre.com

 

 

Domestic Godless: CANALICULUS PURGAMENTORUM, Broadstone Studios Dublin, Friday 16 and Saturday 17th January 2015

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Domestic Godless CANALICULUS PURGAMENTORUM

Broadstone Studios

22 Harcourt Terrace

Dublin 2

 

 

7 – 8.30pm

Friday 16 and Saturday 17th January 2015

 

Inspired by the ubiquitous carousels of global sushi outlets, The Domestic Godless bring Canaliculus Purgamentorum to Broadstone Studios, Dublin, their latest project presenting a collection of amuse-bouches along a canal assembled from sewage ducting.

 

Each dish will offer a nostalgic reminiscence of the universally experienced miserable seaside holiday or otherwise pointed towards Broadstone Studio’s previous existence as the Asylum for Aged Governesses and Unmarried Ladies in 1870, replete with humour and a sense of the absurd. For example, what happens when you cross ice-cream with the contents of an Edwardian vanity cabinet? What did the stuffing from the seats of a 1974 Ford Cortina actually taste like? And what ever happened to that baked bean that escaped from your full-Irish breakfast?

 

For over ten years The Domestic Godless have been a thorn in the foot of Irish gastronomy, with an irreverent disregard for current fashions and culinary trends. They have introduced to the world such delights as Sea Urchin Pot Noodle, Foot & Mouth Terrine, Carpaccio of Giant African Land Snail and Victorian high tea wrought from all manner of fertilizer, often in the setting of anarchic installations.

 

Tickets are available for €20 at Eventbrite :

www.eventbrite.ie/e/the-domestic-godless-canaliculus-purgamentorum-tickets-14991694562

 

Limited places available.

 

This show involves eating and tasting but is not a full meal. Unfortunately, special dietary requirements cannot be accommodated.

 

CANALICULUS PURGAMENTORUM is co-produced with Broadstone Studios and is supported in part by the Arts Council Project Award 2014.

 

More information at:

www.thedomesticgodless.com

www.broadstonestudios.com / 01 661 9010 / contact@broadstonestudios.com

 

 

 

 

Gerard Byrne – Damien Flood: RENEW – Green on Red Gallery Dublin, 11 Dec. 2014 – 31 Jan. 2015

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Green on Red Gallery

Park lane

Spencer Dock,

Dublin 1

 

Renew

Gerard Byrne, John Cronin, Mary Fitzgerald, Damien Flood, Mark Joyce, Caroline McCarthy, Ronan McCrea, Alice Maher and Bridget Riley

 

11 Dec – 31 Jan 2015

 

 

Opening Reception: Thurs 11 December, 6 – 9pm

Exhibition Dates: 12 Dec – 31 Jan 2015

 

 

The Green On Red Gallery announce the reopening of the gallery in Spencer Dock, Dublin 1 ( 150m north of Spencer Dock Luas stop ) on December 11, 2014 with Renew, an exhibition of new work by gallery artists Gerard Byrne, John Cronin, Mary Fitzgerald, Damien Flood, Mark Joyce, Caroline McCarthy, Ronan McCrea, Alice Maher and Bridget Riley.  Renew will be the first exhibition in the new gallery and continues until the end of January 2015.

 

Renew will feature a new suite of 9 prints by Alice Maher shown here for the first time. These are the first new works by the artist seen since her highly successful solo exhibition, Becoming, in the Irish Museum of Modern Art in 2012 and her recently published monograph, Resevoir, published in 2014 by ROAD Publications, Dublin.  The new works are marked by a riot of colour and play with motifs of corporeal and symbolic metamorphosis.  In God’s little helper the female protagonist is overcome with a coat of human hair, as Magdalene was before ( or after ? ) her.

 

Gerard Byrne‘s new Kodak Wratten Filter Systems unique photographs come as close in photography to abstraction as is possible due to the lighting and arrangement of the single colour, century-long, glass filters.  Byrne’s approach to the medium regularly makes poetic and witty side-references to the history of painting, theatre and photography itself.  The result here recalls minimalist ideas of reduction and repetition and a solipsistic pragmatism.

 

Mark Joyce presents two new paintings on panel that recall some of his earlier ’90′s oil on canvas paintings.  Their playful shapes echo letters and numbers but never spell out their message, as a Mel Bochner might.

 

Damien Flood‘s new paintings are stripped back with a fresh and exciting economy.  They hang on a knife-edge between bringing us to familiar and mysterious, unknown worlds.

 

Mary Fitzgerald uses hard-edge and fragile materials that make the most of their reflective qualities and expand the moment of perception.  The viewer is involved and engaged in unexpected twists and turns.

 

In anticipation of her forthcoming solo show at the gallery, Caroline McCarthy presents Woods in November ( 2014 ) acrylic on canvas.  This is a dazzling trompe l’oeil rendition of the most inconsequential subject brought centre stage.  We are made to question our own belief systems and moral code in an upside-down world so convincingly portrayed.

 

Ronan McCrea will exhibit new photographs from his ” reprographic ” project that meditates on current questions about the fin de siécle, as he sees it, of the photographic era in late or post Post-Modernism.  These works have an authority borrowed from the conventions of the medium but can point to new conclusions.

 

Large Fragment by Bridget Riley has an undeniable elegance and mastery that, while harking back to the cut-outs of Henri Matisse, is both fresh and compelling.

 

The Gallery will open to the public from Wednesday-Friday, 10-6pm and on Saturdays 11-3pm.

 

Green on Red Gallery looks forward to welcoming you at the new gallery and to Renew.

Bí linn.

 

For further information :

www.gerardbyrne.com

www.damienflood.ie

www.greenonredgallery.com

 

 

 

 

Sofie Loscher / Liam O’Callaghan: Periodical Review—Pallas Projects/Studios – 5 Dec.’14 – 17 Jan.’15

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Periodical Review—Pallas Projects/Studios

Pallas Projects/Studios
115–117 The Coombe
Dublin 8, Ireland


05/12/14—17/01/15

Gallery hours
12–6pm, Thursday–Saturday
(5th–20th December, gallery open by appointment in January)

 

Michael Beirne, Jenny Brady, Jane Butler, Rachael Corcoran, Anita Delaney, Joe Duggan, Marie Farrington, Hannah Fitz, Mark Garry, Dragana Jurisic, Allyson Keehan, Caoimhe Kilfeather, Ali Kirby, Sofie Locher, Loitering Theatre, Shane Murphy, Liam O’Callaghan, Andreas Kindler Von Knobloch/Resort, Orla Whelan

 

Preview: 6–8pm, Friday 5th December 2014

Selected by Mary Conlon, Paul Hallahan, Gavin Murphy & Mark Cullen

 
An artwork, like a book, is not made up of individual words on a page (or images on a screen), each of which with a meaning, but is instead ‘caught up in a system of references to other books, other texts, other sentences’.

Pallas Projects/Studios presents the fourth in the series of Periodical Review – a unique, yearly survey of Irish contemporary art practices, that looks at commercial gallery shows, museum exhibitions, artist-led and independent projects and curatorial practices. Periodical Review is not a group exhibition per se, it is a discursive action, with the gallery as a magazine-like layout of images that speak (the field talking to itself). An exhibition as resource, in which we invite agents within the field to engage with what were for them significant moments, practices, works, activity, objects: nodes within the network.

Each year PP/S invite two peers – artists, writers, educators, curators – to review and subsequently nominate a number of art practices, selected via an editorial meeting. Such a review-type exhibition within Irish art practice acts to revisit, be a reminder, a critical appraisal and consolidation of ideas and knowledge within the field of contemporary Irish art; to facilitate and encourage collaboration, crossover and debate; and to act as an accessible survey of contemporary art, expanding parameters to art practices around the country.

Previous co-curators have been Matt Packer (Glucksman/Treignac/CCA), Michele Horrigan (Askeaton Contemporary Arts), Eamonn Maxwell (Director, Lismore Castle Arts), Padraic E. Moore (Independent curator), Ruth Carroll (RHA), Carl Giffney (Good Hatchery).

All the works featured in Periodical Review are available to purchase during the course of the exhibition, with commissions on sales going towards developing exhibitions & exchanges at PP/S. In a collaboration with Ormston House the exhibition will be reconfigured and presented in Limerick in 2015.

 

 

Curators

Mary Conlon is a curator based in Limerick. She read literature at University College Dublin and Universidad de Sevilla (1996-2001) and studied Visual Art Practice at Dún Laoghaire Institute of Art, Design & Technology (2002-2006). After graduating, she was appointed as Gallery Manager of Green On Red Gallery. In 2009, she was awarded the third Shinnors Curatorial Research Scholarship and a two-year residency at Limerick City Gallery of Art. In 2011, through the Creative Limerick initiative, she founded the cultural resource centre, Ormston House, where she is Artistic Director. She is curator of the nomadic Six Memos project, drawing on the writings of Italo Calvino, which also forms the basis of her practice-led PhD in Curatorial Studies at Limerick School of Art & Design.  She is a member of the Italian curatorial network vessel and of the Board of Directors of eva International, Ireland’s Biennial of Visual Art.

Paul Hallahan is an artist and curator based in Kildare. He was founder and director of Soma Contemporary, Waterford between 2009 and 2012. In 2013 he was chosen as the first artist in Broadstone Studio’s Invited Artist Series.

Pallas Projects/Studios is a not-for-profit organisation run by artists Mark Cullen and Gavin Murphy, operating since 1996. PP/S collaborates with peers and encourages public engagement with current Irish contemporary art, through the provision of affordable artists’ work-spaces, and an ongoing commitment to lead, provide vision, and develop the visual arts at the grassroots by presenting solo projects, group exhibitions, artist-initiated projects and collaborations with partner arts organisations.

Image: Allyson Keehan, Black Satin in Blue Light Minimal canvas, Oil on Linen, 2014

 

Location map

 

For more information, visit:

http://sofieloscher.ie

www.thegoodroom.com


www.pallasprojects.org
info@pallasprojects.org

Pallas Projects/Studios is kindly supported by Dublin City Council
Pallas Studios is kindly supported The Arts Council (Workspace Award)

 


 

Alan Phelan: Selective Memory – Artists in the archive – Lewis Glucksman Gallery, Cork, 21 November 2014 – 15 March 2015

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Selective Memory

Artists in the archive

Lewis Glucksman Gallery

University College Cork

 

 

Artists: Zbyněk Baladrán, Paulien Barbas, David Raymond Conroy, Dani Gal, Ruth Maclennan, Mike Mandel and Larry Sultan, Lucy McKenzie, Marge Monko, Gavin Murphy, Alan Phelan, Anne Ramsden, Jasper Rigole, Valerie Snobeck, Sean Snyder, Miek Zwamborn


Curated by Chris Clarke and Orla Murphy
In association with Digital Arts & Humanities, University College Cork

 

The archive preserves the past, its remnants and records, within a repository of human knowledge. However, it also offers a space for critical engagement and creative invention, for challenging the archive’s supposed objectivity with unorthodox histories, subversive interpretations and speculative ideas. Drawing on photographs, documents, film footage and texts, artists have used the archive to create new works from existing materials, to unsettle established readings of the past and to imagine alternative narratives. Selective Memory: Artists in the archive explores the ways in which Irish and international artists continually return to the archive, in order to imbue it with a new sense of subjectivity and individuality.

 

The specific materials associated with the archive are revealed in the work of several artists. Miek Zwamborn’s sculptural installation is inspired by her research into a 19th century herbarium or plant album found in the archives in which she works. Speculating upon the owner’s inscribed dedication to an apparent lover, the artist re-traces the relationship between these two individuals through objects and texts displayed in horizontal drawers and trays. This process of drawing connections between disparate images and materials also informs Lucy McKenzie’s Quodlibet series, a term referring to topics of theological or philosophical debate. While resembling billboards pinned with photographs, leaflets and writings around given subjects, these trompe l’oeil oil paintings play with the tension between the temporary, tangential relationship and the permanence of her chosen medium. The speculative associations that McKenzie forges from diverse source materials are forever fixed in her precisely detailed and illusionistic compositions.

Anne Ramsden’s project Museum of the Everyday finds its material in the photographs that the artist collects on her online flickr archive. Ramsden appropriates and combines representational codes present in advertising, the media and museums, and, in this series, re-frames banal, everyday images as posters for imagined collections and exhibitions. This impulse is shared with Jasper Rigole, whose practice explores and re-contextualises archival film footage drawn from home movies, travel videos and anthropological documentaries. His ongoing project The International Institute for the Conservation, Archiving and Distribution of Other People’s Memories examines how such amateur materials fall outside of the remit of ‘official’ archival collections.

The re-editing of found footage into new narratives is represented in video works by Zbyněk Baladrán and Marge Monko. In Baladrán’s piece Working Process, he overlays grainy film sequences from Soviet Czechoslovakia with segments of text, while Monko’s work sets still photographs of Estonian factory workers to an excerpt from a play by the Austrian Nobel Prize winner Elfriede Jelinek. Dani Gal re-enacts the first Israeli television broadcast in 1966 through his research into newspaper articles and testimonials. This event, undocumented at the time, demonstrates the capacity for speculation concerning omissions in the archive, and, in Ruth Maclennan’s film of interviews with professional archivists, she emphasises this tendency by disruptively editing their responses. Gavin Murphy’s film Something New Under The Sun also takes place in the archive, following a researcher who delves into the history of Dublin’s iconic, and now demolished, IMCO building.

Mike Mandel and Larry Sultan‘s Evidence series from 1975-77 represents a seminal moment in the way artists engage with the site and materials of the archive. This selection of photographic images found in public and private American institutions, agencies and corporations was one of the first conceptual artworks to demonstrate that the meaning of an image is conditioned by the context and sequence in which it is seen. Paulien Barbas photographs objects from the archives of the Bauhaus, emphasising their staging and display by, for instance, revealing the lens flare of the camera of the clump of blu-tack that props up an item. In Alan Phelan’s Handjob series, the artist himself has collected and compiled images, materials and paraphernalia that relates to representations of the human hand. Phelan’s playful and provocative collection, which began as a convalescence activity after breaking his thumb, has grown to include objects and artworks from colleagues and friends as well as online images. In this way, the notion of the artist’s hand as the bearer of an individual, tactile, and expressive gesture has become the impetus for an ever-expanding and collaborative archive.

Speculation towards the original context of archival materials and the decisions that warranted their inclusion in a collection is addressed in a number of works. By obscuring or effacing an appropriated image, artists point to an inherent ambiguity, a sense of the unknowable, around such materials. Valerie Snobeck’s images are mined from the 1970s Documerica project, a government initiative to document the state of the American environment. However, by encasing the photographs in layers of mesh, plastic, netting and burlap, she renders the original images indecipherable. David Raymond Conroy displays partially erased pages from found books alongside a video of overlapping online screen grabs, sound-tracked with an enigmatic monologue on accessibility and the internet. Sean Snyder’s practice involves the transference of his extensive archive of photographs and videos into digital files, destroying the originals in the process. While his images capture the effects of transmission, corruption and compression in the digitizing of materials, they also acknowledge the residual traces left over. Even as the physical document disappears, a new archive is formed in the process.

Developed in partnership with Digital Arts & Humanities, University College Cork, Selective Memory explores the archive as a space that is continually open to new readings and revisions. While artworks in the exhibition address themes such as material, narrative, site and speculation, they have been further designated with ‘keywords’ that allow for different trajectories to be mapped across the physical layout of the galleries. Capturing the ways in which artists and academics explore the archive, this non-linear approach invites the viewer to sift through materials, follow distinct lines of inquiry and to forge new, unanticipated connections.

Notes on the artists and artworks

Selective Memory includes work by the Irish artists Gavin Murphy and Alan Phelan. Gavin Murphy has exhibited his worn throughout Ireland at galleries including Dublin City Gallery The Hugh Lane, Royal Hibernian Academy, Oonagh Young Gallery and eva International. Alan Phelan’s recent exhibitions include solo shows at Detroit, Stockholm; Golden Thread Gallery, Belfast; and Cairo Video Festival.

Zbyněk Baladrán represented The Czech Republic at their national pavilion for the 55th Venice Biennale in 2013. Dani Gal was included in that same year’s curated exhibition The Encyclopedic Palace.

Lucy McKenzie is currently the subject of a solo exhibition at the Art Institute of Chicago. Her other recent solo shows include exhibitions at the Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam; The Artist’s Institute, New York; and Cabinet, London.

Marge Monko‘s film Nora’s Sister, included as part of Selective Memory, was included in the roving European art biennial Manifesta 9 in Genk, Belgium.

Sean Snyder is exhibiting work from his 2009 project Index from the Institute of Contemporary Arts, London. Index involved the artist editing and digitising images from previous research projects so that the files of his practice could fit onto a single USB stick.

Mike Mandel and Larry Sultan’s Evidence project was created from 1975-77 while the artists were graduate students. The resulting series of photographs and artists’ book was one of the first examples of contemporary artists engaging with archival materials. Larry Sultan is the subject of a career retrospective at Los Angeles County Museum of Art from November 9, 2014 – March 22, 2015.

It is possible to arrange for press interviews with the curators and some of the participating artists. For further discussion of the exhibition, press images or more detailed information, please contact:
Chris Clarke, Senior Curator, c.clarke@ucc.ie or +353 21 4901822, Lewis Glucksman Gallery, University College Cork, Ireland.

Notes on events in the exhibition:

The Lewis Glucksman Gallery makes great art available to everyone. A wide range of events and activities are programmed for all abilities throughout the exhibition run.

You can view the entire programme in the seasonal brochure at http://glucksman.org/CurrentBrochure.pdf

To learn about new media art:

Art + Ideas: Dr. Sarah Cook
1pm, Wednesday 11 February http://glucksman.org/artandideas.html

To hear from artists and film-makers :

Perspectives: Artist Talk series
Alan Phelan, artist, 1pm, Thursday 19 February Gavin Murphy, artist, 1pm, Thursday 26 February Carmel Winters, film-maker, date tbc http://glucksman.org/perspectives.html

For family audiences:

Family Sundays: making art together
3-4pm, Sundays from 23 November – 14 December, 2014 and 11 January – 15 March, 2015

http://glucksman.org/familysundays.html

 

Glucksman Gallery Cork thanks  all artists and lenders of artworks for Selective Memory including Galerie Catherine Bastide, Brussels; Galerie Chantal Crousel, Paris; Defares Collection; Collection Nicoletta Fiorucci, London; Collection Fotomusem Winterthur; Freymund-Guth Fine Arts, Zurich; hunt kastner, Prague; LUX, London; Seventeen, London; Galerie Micheline Szwajcer, Brussels; and private collections.

 

Selective Memory is supported by University College Cork, The Arts Council Ireland and private philanthropy through Cork University Foundation.

 

 

More information available at:

www.alanphelan.com

www.glucksman.org

 

 

Damien Flood – Isabel Nolan – Sarah Pierce: PULL BITE RALLY – Black Church Process Project, NCAD Gallery Dublin, November 19 – December 16, 2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NCAD Gallery in collaboration and partnership with the Black Church Print Studio present an

exhibition and parallel event series to mark the Black Church Process project.

 

PULL BITE RALLY

BRIAN FAY / DAMIEN FLOOD / JESSE JONES / ISABEL NOLAN / SARAH PIERCE.

 

Exhibition open view

Wednesday 19th November 2014, 6pm, NCAD Gallery.

Performance by Sarah Pierce

Wednesday 19th November 2014, 7pm, NCAD Gallery.

Exhibition continues

Thursday 20th November – Tuesday 16th December 2014.

 

NCAD Gallery,

100 Thomas Street, Dublin 8.

 

Gallery opening hours 1pm – 5pm. Admission is free.

 

 

Pull Bite Rally is the first exhibition to mark the Black Church Print Studio’s dynamic initiative, Process. As part of the Studio’s artistic programme, Process invites leading art practitioners to work with the resources and expertise of the Studio in the production of original artworks. For the Pull Bite Rally exhibition artists, Brian Fay, Damien Flood, Jesse Jones, Isabel Nolan and Sarah Pierce present their artworks and continued collaboration at NCAD Gallery. Through explorative processes, the artist’s intent is facilitated by the skills and experience of a dedicated printmaking team of master print-makers and print coordinators. This collaboration between artist and the Studio aims to give practitioners a comprehensive understanding of the processes and concepts of printmaking leading to new directions in their practice.

 

Integral and in addition to the exhibition, responses from practitioners, leading figures in the visual arts and the wider public are invited to participate in rigorous inquiry and discussion that Pull Bite Rally invokes. NCAD Gallery’s collegial context affords the opportunity to form close exhibition partner relationships with staff and students from the NCAD College departments and further afield to form a parallel event series. Over the four week exhibition period a programme of events, screenings and talks are scheduled in consideration of the central theme of process. Engaging key topics fundamental to the artists’ project experience, with reference to: the potentiality of collaboration and creative professional links for artists; printed matter and publishing; authorship and reproduction; medium specificity; professional practice pathways, skills and exchange; pedagogical foundations and shifts in contemporary art practice.

 

To mention only a few of the event highlights, Declan Long is in conversation with artist and 2014 Turner Prize nominee, Ciara Phillips, on Monday 24th November, 6pm. In a special one-off episode of TV Museum: The Mini-Series, Maeve Connolly investigates temporal, social and political aspects of serial publication and distribution. Connolly’s titled ‘Serial Publications and Practices’ lecture reconsiders some of the strategies employed by General Idea and also explores the work of various contemporary artists and institutions engaged in the production of newspapers, journals and serialised moving images, posing questions about the changing form and function of seriality in art, media and culture – Wednesday 3rd December, 5pm. ‘Repeat. Don’t stop’ is the NCAD MA Art in the Contemporary World organised public seminar that delves into ways to critically engage with current forms of artistic repetition and reproduction, considering how ideas and processes explored in the Pull Bite Rally exhibition relate to the broader contexts of twenty-first century art, Friday 28th November, 2pm.

 

* Please see the full event listings below.

 

* On the occasion of the exhibition writer Niamh Dunphy is commissioned to write the essay ‘Trace and Use’ published in the Pull Bite Rally pamphlet available throughout the exhibition at NCAD Gallery.

 

 

Pull Bite Rally schedule of Exhibition Events:

 

Wednesday 19th Nov 2014, 7pm. NCAD Gallery.

● Exhibiting artist, Sarah Pierce performance on the opening night of Pull Bite Rally

 

Friday 21st Nov 2014, 5.30pm. Harry Clarke Theatre, NCAD.

● A screening of ‘Before the page has turned’ by Jaki Irvine.

 

Monday 24th Nov 2014, 6pm. Harry Clarke Theatre, NCAD.

● Pull, Bite, Rally NCAD Research Institute funded keynote lecture: Ciara Phillips, artist and 2014 Turner Prize nominee in conversation with Declan Long.

 

Friday 28th Nov 2014, 2pm – 4pm. Harry Clarke Theatre, NCAD.

● Repeat. Don’t stop. In this MA Art in the Contemporary World public seminar, ways to critically engage with current forms of artistic repetition and reproduction, considering how ideas and processes explored in the Pull Bite Rally exhibition relate to the broader contexts of twenty-first century art are considered.

 

Friday 28th Nov 2014, 5.30pm. NCAD Gallery.

● Process Artists Talk, exhibiting artists event with the initial three Process project artists Brian Fay / Damien Flood / Jesse Jones with master printmakers Debora Ando / Mary A. Fitzgerald / print coordinator Dave McGinn, chaired by artist Colin Martin.

 

Monday 1st Dec 2014, 2pm. NCAD Gallery.

● Sarah Pierce in conversation with Donal Maguire, curator and Administrator of the ESB Centre for the Study of Irish Art at the National Gallery of Ireland will talk about the collaboration between the artist and the archive in the context of Pierce’s work, My dear Betty.

 

Wednesday 3rd Dec 2014, 5pm. Harry Clarke Theatre, NCAD.

● TV Museum: The Mini-Series, Maeve Connolly investigates temporal, social and political aspects of serial publication and distribution. Connolly’s titled ‘Serial Publications and Practices’ lecture reconsiders some of the strategies employed by General Idea and also explores the work of various contemporary artists and institutions engaged in the production of newspapers, journals and serialised moving images, posing questions about the changing form and function of seriality in art, media and culture.

 

Friday 5th Dec 2014, 5pm. Harry Clarke Theatre, NCAD.

● The current NCAD 4th yr BA print department artist collective, GUM Collective screen their self-made documentary on what it means to be part of a collective with Q & A. GUM will also launch their current publication.

 

Tuesday 9th Dec 2014, 5.30pm. Harry Clarke Theatre, NCAD.

● Once a printmaker, always a printmaker: 15 minute professional practice / artists presentations. Debora Ando / Cora Cummins / Taffina Flood / Andrew Folan / Mary A. Fitzgerald / Margaret O’Brien

 

Wednesday 10th Dec4.30pm. Black Church Print Studio.

● ‘Prosperity Project’, Jesse Jones in conversation with Raymond Henshaw to discuss the percent for art commission for the Dublin Convention Centre.

 

Friday 12th December, 5pm. Harry Clarke Theatre, NCAD.

● ‘The Palimpsest Project’, NCAD Fine Art Print Department presents a lecture and student discussion forum. A thirty minute screening of the student time lapse animation spanning over ten years introduced by the Head of Fine Art Print, Andrew Folan.

 

www.ncad.ie/gallery-event/view/pull-bite-rally

 

Exhibition team:

Michelle Browne / Hazel Burke / (studio artist) – Mary A.Fitzgerald / Anne Kelly / Colin Martin.

 

Image: ‘The Golden Age has yet to come’, (2012) by Jesse Jones. Silkscreen on mirror / glass.

 

More information:

www.damienflood.ie

www.isabelnolan.com

http://themetropolitancomplex.com

http://maryafitzgerald.wordpress.com

www.print.ie

www.ncad.ie/gallery-event/view/pull-bite-rally